Archive for the ‘Lifehacker’ Category

Where to Get the Best Free Education Online

May 1, 2011

From Lifehacker

Whether you’re a student looking for supplemental learning or you’re in the workforce but thirsty for knowledge, you don’t have to drop thousands of dollars in tuition to enjoy a top-notch education from some of the best schools in the world.

While most online resources won’t grant you a college degree, there’s a lot more to the internet than Wikipedia when it comes to learning. Whether you learn best through video or text, want to take a year-long course or just to touch up on a few topics, there are more than a few places online that can give you the full experience. In fact, there are enough that it can get quite overwhelming, so we’ve rounded up the best resources to make it all a bit more manageable. Here are some of the best places to get an education without ever leaving your computer.

Read the rest at http://lifehacker.com/#!5615716/where-to-get-the-best-free-education-online

How To Rip and Clean Your Analog Audio Collection

June 23, 2010

From Lifehacker.com
We’ve discussed a number of steps to digitize your audio, but if you’re looking to delve a bit deeper into ripping all that analog media, technology weblog Tested takes you through the process start to finish.

Whether you want to get the highest quality sound possible, or you just can’t find that old, rare, live cut anywhere else, sometimes you have no other choice but to break out the old LP collection. Of course, ripping an LP to your computer isn’t as easy as ripping a CD, especially if you want it to sound like it did the first day you bought it. Lots of your records are probably pretty old and have some wear and tear on them, causing them to click, pop, and hiss—so you’ll need to do a bit of work before they’re ready to put on your iPod.

Tested takes you through the entire process using previously mentioned open source audio editor Audacity, from hooking up the hardware to dialing down the noise to equalizing it all out. They use a few tracks that they ripped themselves as examples, so you can hear what your files should sound like before and after each step in the process. Hit the link for the full walkthrough, and be sure to share your analog audio-ripping tips in the comments.

Read How to Rip and Clean Your Analog Audio Collection at Tested

ReclaimPrivacy Bookmarklet Rates Your Facebook Exposure Levels

May 17, 2010

From Lifehacker

Facebook’s privacy settings are notoriously complex, and the results of changes hard to see instantly. ReclaimPrivacy.org has a handy bookmarklet that shows which potentially insecure and privacy-invading settings are enabled on your Facebook account when you click it.

ReclaimPrivacy’s bookmarklet focuses on just a few key areas where Facebook can share information with the public—having your contacts, connections, and tagged photos exposed to the public, as well as allowing your friends to accidentally expose that information themselves. It also looks at your relationship with Facebook’s personalization, applications, and other aspects to see what Facebook and independent developers can find out about you, then rates your exposure level in simple Good, Caution, or Insecure levels, along with offering links to change those settings.

Read the rest at Lifehacker

How Can I Ditch Cable and Watch My TV Shows and Movies Online?

February 24, 2010

Dear Lifehacker,
I’d love to get rid of cable and stream all my favorite TV shows right from the internet. What do I need to know before I take the plunge?

Signed,
Ready to Cut the Coaxial

Join the club! Some of us at Lifehacker HQ have already left or are ready to leave the cable company for 24/7 live TV streaming, too. We get this question all the time, and we’ve examined ditching the monthly bill in favor of watching programs online occasionally in the past, and we’ve also looked at ways to get your TV fix with apps like Boxee and Hulu, plus there are cool set-top devices like Roku and TiVo, but this is a good opportunity to get exhaustive. There are so many great options for catching a show here or there, but can you rely on them to replicate the cable TV experience? Well, yes and no.

Read the rest at Lifehacker

Most Popular Hive Five Topics of 2009

December 30, 2009

Every week we pose a simple, focused question to the Lifehacker readership about a specific topic: Which is best? From netbooks and malware removal to home servers and wallpaper, here’s a look back at the most popular Hive Five topics of 2009.

The Hive Five asks the question “Which is best?” in a variety of topics covering hardware, software, and sometimes even a combination of the two. Although sometimes it’s easy to predict the winner—Ubuntu has had its share of wins, to be sure—the real value in the Hive Five isn’t actually its ability to elevate a single winner to a pedestal but to highlight all the great options that are out there.

Between the four runners up in each Hive Five and the other options highlighted in the hundreds of comments on both the Hive Five Call for Contenders and the actual Hive Five every week, it’s easy to discover new things. If ever you’re not sold on the winner of any Hive Five always make sure to read over the comments and see if any of them tip you off to a new and awesome product you’d never heard of.

Read the rest at Lifehacker

How to Fix Your Relatives’ Terrible Computer

November 26, 2009

Drop your bags, grab a drink, and grab the XP CD—it’s time for the holiday ritual of fixing up your relatives’ computer. Here are some tips and downloads to keep handy while you’re cursing all the auto-starting crapware.
For this guide, we’re going to do a bit of assuming. We’re assuming the relative with the busted computer is running a Windows system, and has an internet connection that works when the computer does. We’re assuming all the physical pieces of the computer work—hard drive, memory, disc drives, and anything else that’s crucial. We’ll also assume the computer’s in one of two states: Failing to boot and needing an OS re-installation, laden with unnecessary system tray/startup applications and/or spy/mal/ad-ware, or just needing a little optimization.

Read the reset at Lifehacker

Lifehacker Pack 2009: Our List of Essential Free Windows Downloads

June 1, 2009

We feature downloads of all kinds every day at Lifehacker. Today, however, we’re bundling all the best free downloads for new computer owners, re-installers, would-be geeks, or anyone who wants to save time installing the best stuff out there. This is our 2009 Lifehacker Pack for Windows computers.

The idea is the same as when we first introduced the Lifehacker Pack more than three years ago—a single, handy list that we think improves the computer lives of Windows users. We’re also providing a utility to download some or all of these applications at once—more on that after the list.

You can head directly to each application’s download page from the [Download] links following their write-ups, and see what Lifehacker originally wrote about them at the [LH Post] link. If there’s a portable version of an application that you can run off a thumb drive and/or test out without installing, we’ve linked to that at [Portable], or added a “+Portable” to the main download link.

Onto the list!

Read the rest here

Five Best Malware Removal Tools

April 26, 2009

On Thursday we asked you to share your favorite tool for purging malware from your computer. We’ve tallied the votes and we’re back with the top five contenders for best malware removal tool.
The internet—unfortunately—isn’t a never-ending buffet of secure open-source software and Bollywood-style musicals starring LOLCats. There are people and organizations that delight in stealing your personal data, hijacking your computer, and making a general nuisance of themselves through malicious software. This week we’re highlighting the top five tools for removing software with ill-intentions from you PC.

Read the rest at Lifehacker

Top 10 Tools for Landing a Better Job

February 21, 2009

From the first Google search to the last interview, you can boost your odds at landing a better job with the right preparation. Here are our ten best tools and tips for job-seekers and career climbers.
10. Cover all the search sites.
It’s not exactly a “hack” to suggest hitting Monster.com, or your LinkedIn network, to check out job offerings and work your connections. Each site amongst our five best online job search sites, however, puts you in a different pool of possibilities, and each has its own quirks and tools. They’re somewhat perfunctory and broad, but wouldn’t you feel bad knowing you missed a great opportunity simply because it wasn’t in your super-specific Craigslist search?

Read the rest at Lifehacker

Computer Repair Kit Packs Dozens of Tools in One Portable Package

February 17, 2009

Portable system-fixing bundle Computer Repair Utility Kit puts 57 recovery tools into a single package. That gives you easy access to important system utilities without the fuss of building your own toolkit.

The launcher can be run directly from the folder or copied to a flash drive for access from any system, with a system tray menu for quick access to the included tools—which can be tweaked to add your own favorite portable applications. Most of the included utilities are familiar to Lifehacker readers, with well-known utilities like reader favorites CCleaner, PC Decrapifier, and Process Explorer along with dozens of other utilities that perform tasks ranging from killing spyware to system tweaking—and a copy of Portable Firefox is even included for good measure. If you haven’t taken the time to build your own flash drive toolkit, this download might be worth a look to get you started.

Read the rest at Lifehacker. Note: Read the comments, there may be some problems with virus checkers.
Original post at Technibble. See the second version for a list of the programs and download mirrors.