Archive for the ‘music’ Category

60 Open Source Replacements for Audio/Video Tools

September 16, 2011

From Datamation

Most computer users are spending much more time these days viewing and creating multimedia content. According to comScore, 85.6 percent of online Americans (178 million people) watched video online in June 2011, and they spent an average of 16.8 hours each watching those videos during the month. In addition, Nielsen reports that the number of people watching video on their smartphones and tablets has increased 41 percent since last year.

But it isn’t just video viewing that’s growing—more people are also using their PCs and mobile devices to listen to music. Earlier this year, Steve Jobs announced that 200 million people have iTunes accounts.

In keeping with this trend, the open source community has created dozens of projects to help you create, find, edit, organize and manage your audio and video files. Here are 60 of the best open source tools that can replace commercial audio/video software.

Read the rest at http://www.datamation.com/open-source/60-open-source-replacements-for-audiovideo-tools-1.html

Also see these related articles:
67 Open Source Replacements for Really Expensive Applications
63 Open Source Replacements for Popular Financial Software
60 Open Source Tools for Protecting Your Privacy
50 Must-Have Open Source Apps for Your Home Office

Or other articles on my blog for free software or at my web site http://jerry620.shorturl.com/

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The Easiest Way To Move Your iTunes Library To An External Drive

March 1, 2011

From: MakeUseOf.com

Storage space is one of the biggest problems for laptop users. You can run out of those bytes in no time at all, especially if you fill your laptop with multimedia files like music and movies – the types of files that you keep and manage using a multimedia manager like iTunes.

A quick look at the folder sizes inside my MacBook hard drive shows that the iTunes folder occupies a large area on that near-full storage space. To regain some room to breathe, I decided to move my collections to an external drive.

If the problem is only moving everything inside the iTunes folder to the external drive, a simple cut and paste would solve it. The trick however is to keep everything intact. Nobody wants to re-fill hundreds (or thousands) of song information, re-assign all the ratings, re-paste all lyrics and re-hunt for the cover art. The only thing that should be different after the move is the location.

Read the rest at: MakeUseOf.com

10 Websites For TV Show & Movie Soundtracks

November 30, 2010

From MakeUseOf.com

Sometimes it’s the music that makes the movies. You just have to watch ‘Sound of Music’ or ‘Saturday Night Fever’ to understand what I am talking about. You have to be a Martian not to have heard about either of those two. Then let me throw ‘The Wizard of Oz’ at you, a movie that entered the musical consciousness of a lot of people, as time went by.

Yes, it’s the magic of movies. But even as the movie unspools, music lends a bit of its own too. Just for the nitpickers, let’s use the more precise term of soundtrack. The word ‘soundtrack’ has obviously come from the sound recording on a narrow strip of a motion picture film, which runs with the images. Today, we also know it as a Film Score or more promotionally as OST (Original Soundtrack). It’s music by another name and quite similarly, it can uplift, it can sadden or it can give us goose pimples.

If you have seen ‘Chariots of Fire’, then the opening scene with Vangelis’ score is as energizing as the scene of the athletes. Or take the space imagery that’s shaped by ‘The Blue Danube’ in Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece (2001: A Space Odyssey).

Am I coming off like a besotted fan of movie tunes? I guess you can call me that. Once upon a time, I used to wait for the end credits just to see who performed which song even as everyone moved towards the exit.

These days, I tap a few keys and access a listing of movie soundtracks from websites such as these:

Read the rest at MakeUseOf.com

The unofficial guide to installing iTunes 10 without bloatware

September 11, 2010

From ZDNet.com

iTunes 10 might be brand new, but little has changed in Cupertino. Apple still gives Windows users a single installer that clutters your hard disk with a bunch of unnecessary components, some of which can be harmful to your system’s security and reliability.

When you run the iTunes setup program, it unpacks six Windows Installer packages and a master setup program, which then installs nearly 300MB of program and support files, a kernel-mode CD/DVD-burning driver, multiple system services, and a bunch of browser plugins. It configures two “helper” programs to start automatically every time you start your PC, giving you no easy way to disable them. It installs a network service that many iTunes users don’t need. I show you how to take control of the iTunes 10 installer so you get exactly what you want and nothing more.

Read the rest at ZDNet.com

112 Best Free Downloads, Sites, and Services: The Full List

July 20, 2010

From PCWorld

Here’s our entire collection of the best free downloads, sites, and services available today, sorted by category.

Want to correct Windows problems, make your PC or mobile phone more capable, and get things done faster online–all without opening your wallet? Check out these 112 incredibly useful, incredibly free downloads, sites, and services.

This year, we divided our picks for the Best Free Stuff into 17 categories, listed below. If you can’t decide where to start, take a look at the greatest hits–some of the classics we’ve spotlighted over our 15 years of picking free apps, services, and sites. Or try a few of our favorite social networking and video assistants, programs and services we couldn’t have even imagined that long ago.

Of course, we also have selections in popular categories such as PC customization, security, and productivity, as well as photo and system utilities, lifestyle enhancers, timesavers, and more.

Read the rest @ PCWorld

How To Rip and Clean Your Analog Audio Collection

June 23, 2010

From Lifehacker.com
We’ve discussed a number of steps to digitize your audio, but if you’re looking to delve a bit deeper into ripping all that analog media, technology weblog Tested takes you through the process start to finish.

Whether you want to get the highest quality sound possible, or you just can’t find that old, rare, live cut anywhere else, sometimes you have no other choice but to break out the old LP collection. Of course, ripping an LP to your computer isn’t as easy as ripping a CD, especially if you want it to sound like it did the first day you bought it. Lots of your records are probably pretty old and have some wear and tear on them, causing them to click, pop, and hiss—so you’ll need to do a bit of work before they’re ready to put on your iPod.

Tested takes you through the entire process using previously mentioned open source audio editor Audacity, from hooking up the hardware to dialing down the noise to equalizing it all out. They use a few tracks that they ripped themselves as examples, so you can hear what your files should sound like before and after each step in the process. Hit the link for the full walkthrough, and be sure to share your analog audio-ripping tips in the comments.

Read How to Rip and Clean Your Analog Audio Collection at Tested

How To Convert Audio Cassettes & LPs to MP3 in 5 Easy Steps

April 17, 2009

Do you want to listen to your old music cassettes or vinyl records on your iPod or PC? Well, there’s a easy way to convert all of your precious LPs to MP3 using the free Audacity software!

We have covered Audacity before, to record audio files or create your own MP3 ringtones. Now let’s see how you can use it to convert your audio cassettes and LPs to MP3 files. This article assumes you’re using Audacity on Windows, but you can also do this on Mac/Linux.

What You Need…

Read the rest at MakeUseOf

Coda.fm – Music Album Torrents Directory (Q&A with Admin)

March 21, 2009

A great website surfaced not too long ago, and it has been a a gold mine for music lovers everywhere : a torrent site fully dedicated to music, with an UI to make Amazon envious. In this article we’ll discuss the past and future with its creator and administrator, a mysterious web developer from Europe, who wishes to remain anonymous due to threats from the RIAA and IFPI. We’ll also take a look at Coda.fm and analyze how it has changed the way you will download music.

Read the rest at MakeUseOf